Adventures in Property Inspections

As a MAI designated commercial appraiser, over the past 10 years, I have conducted a couple of thousand commercial property inspections, and each inspection is as unique as the commercial property appraisal.  During an inspection I am typically accompanied by the owner or the owner’s agent.  Most times the inspections are uneventful, and the owner/agent is helpful in providing insightful property, neighborhood and market area information needed to complete a comprehensive appraisal of the subject property.  However, there have been occasions when the inspection becomes eventful –

The Helpful Owner

I do occasionally encounter owners who want to point out all the subject property’s current or planned amenities that they believe will significantly impact the value.  Earlier this year I appraised an office park complex located parallel to a major highway in central Ohio.  I was advised by the lender that the complex was fully leased and thus the income approach would be required.  During the inspection, the owner shared that he thought it was vital that I consider the fact that he could have a billboard on his property which would generate additional income.  Further, the owner spent a considerable amount of time sharing his marketing brochures to clearly demonstrate the type of tenants he would soon have in the complex.  At the time of the inspection, the owner was the only tenant in the office complex, while the lender thought the property was fully leased.

The Fearful Tenant

On another occasion I was engaged to complete an appraisal of a federally funded senior housing property in Pennsylvania.  This was my second time inspecting the property, my first inspection was for the completion of a capital needs assessment and was approximately 120 days prior.  Upon my arrival for the inspection I was notified by the property manager that one of the tenants (let’s call her Carol) was terribly concerned that I was there to take her dog.  As another tenant (let’s call her Diane) stated that during my first inspection she saw me taking notes and overheard me saying Carol’s dog was too big to live in the complex and would need to be removed from the premises.  Diane made sure she shared this erroneous information with Carol.  And apparently for 120 days Carol lived in horror that her beloved pet would be taken away.  I had to assure the property manager that the information Diane shared was not accurate and that was not the purpose of my inspection.  During the inspection, I found out that Carol and Diane have an on-going feud which I assume is still going strong.

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FRG Continues Expansion Into Mid-Atlantic Region

Feasibility Research Group (FRG) has been selected to provide Appraisal Services for the District of Columbia Housing Authority.

University Heights, OH (April 3, 2019) — FEASIBILITY RESEARCH GROUP (FRG), a real estate appraisal and consulting firm based in Northeast Ohio, has been selected for Appraisal Services with the District of Columbia Housing Authority.

The District of Columbia Housing Authority requires professional appraisal services to support its Office of Capital Programs.  The programs that FRG will support include the appraisal of mixed income, mix use development, public housing apartments.

“FRG looks forward to supporting the District of Columbia Housing Authority with their appraisal needs” said Gregory Williams, MAI and FRG‘s Owner and Managing Director. “FRG’s appraisals will support DCHA’s initiative to provide livable housing to support healthy and sustainable communities.”

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Autonomous Cars and Real Estate

Yes, I love my car.  My car is fully paid for.  No car payments for me.

2007 malibu

I am the proud owner of a 2006 Chevy sedan with over 115,000 miles.  Now I will note that I am starting to see small rust spots on the hood and trunk of my car.  And I have always had some sort of electronic gremlin that causes the doors to lock and unlock at will, whether I am in the car of not.  And I think the CD changer stopped working about 4 years into my ownership experience.  But despite all of this I love my Chevy.  And the reason why I love this car is it is 100% paid for – no monthly car payments.

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